Microwave – Day 22

We’ve come a long way.  Our equipment has become very sophisticated and very powerful.  We can now make food very quickly.  With all the great inventions and new technology, we’ve managed to make food faster.  However, we have not managed to make food better.  That’s why it’s no sacrifice to me, to get rid of a microwave.  It’s no sacrifice to skip the freezer section of the market where the overly processed microwave “food” is found in all that packaging.  It’s no sacrifice to cook great meals and reheat them in a saucepan on the stove, or by heating them in the oven.  It’s no sacrifice to make real popcorn, and buying popcorn kernels is much cheaper than microwave popcorn, and doesn’t come with all that extra packagine.  It’s no sacrifice to make a fresh cup of coffee rather than reheating an old one.  Find out how to brew Tiny House Coffee here.

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Xaver’s Tiny House Coffee

In a tiny house situation, the power a microwave requires may also be a problem since it may overwhelm the system or cause a breaker to flip.  Trust me, that always happens when it’s cold, rainy, and after dark and then one of us has to go out in that weather with a flashlight to get the breaker turned back on!  lol!  In an off-grid situation, running a microwave may not even be an option because they are such energy hogs.  So part of becoming comfortable with tiny house living may include finding other ways to cook food without the use of the microwave.

Finally, there are some very real health concerns in microwaved food.  I’ve read the results of various research on the topic and I’m convinced there are valid concerns.  However, I’m not interested in debating any of that.  I’m not a scientist but I do respect what scientist do.  For me it’s much simpler to cook without it to remove the question, and the concern – and even the debate.  I really don’t want the debate!  In fact, I am willing to be ridiculed on this topic (and have been – at length!) rather than even engage in the battle.  I love peace.  I love people, even when we disagree.  I’m very secure that the choice I’ve made is the right one for me and of course I recognize that some folks won’t agree.  And that’s actually fine with me.  I choose not to eat microwaved food and I prefer not to eat in restaurants where I know the food will be microwaved.  Food artists don’t cook that way anyway, so that’s hardly a sacrifice.  No problem.  In short, I lose nothing by avoiding a microwave.  I skip the health concern and I eat better food.  Where’s the sacrifice?

16 mealsIf you have a microwave, take it out and look it over.  It’s an automatic toss if it is damaged or malfunctioning.  Put it in the garage or other distant room of the house for a while.  Clean the spot where the microwave was and consider your kitchen without it.  Make a contest of it and see who can go the longest without using it.  You have nothing to lose.

What you “need” is based on what you’re used to.  Change what you’re used to, and it will change what you need.  So the best way to make a real change in your kitchen is to simply dive in and get going.  You may not think that you can “go tiny”, but I know you can.  And from my years of experience living in 120 square feet, I can honestly tell you that what you gain makes every “sacrifice” worth it.  (Otherwise I would not have purchased a short bus where the living space will be 110 square feet!)  In time you might even find that none of it was actually a sacrifice, at least that’s how I feel.

I’m Carmen Shenk, the Tiny House Foodie, reminding you that we can #LiveTiny #EmbraceSimplicity and still #EatWell.  Thanks for watching, I really appreciate it!29c45-1a2bcarmen

 

Mixing and Whipping – Day 20

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Kitchen Aid Still Life

Today we tackle the tools that mix and blend including the stand mixer, the hand held mixer, and various hand tools.  Pull out all your tools that serve these functions and consider the redundancy in your collection.  Choose your favorites and make changes as needed.  Then move the rest to the donation box and clean out your kitchen cabinet and return the remaining items neatly.

Xaver and I have just purchased a short bus and we’ll be building out the interior for our third tiny home so I’m considering the usefulness of each item right along with you.  Since we’ll be going from 125 square feet, down to 110 square feet – and it will be configured very differently – it’s not going to be a huge adjustment and we are very excited about the places we’ll visit and the people we will meet along the way.  This also serves as a reminder of why we continue to work at downsizing and it helps us to reinvigorate our efforts.  Perhaps you would appreciate a reminder of why you’re going to all the trouble to downsize or right-size your kitchen.  Today take a moment to remember the goals you had when you began this process and remember what you stand to gain.  The more we focus on the simplicity and order we gain from this process, as opposed to the losses of downsizing, the more we’ll be able to enjoy the transition.

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VINNIE 3 – our new short bus

Recently I scrolled through social media looking at photos taken by folks who have only recently gone tiny and over and over again I’m reading the joy they have in this journey.  I saw again the sense of accomplishment and enjoyment these folks have their small cozy spaces.  I have been at this for a number of years so it’s easy to forget how exciting and joyful it was at the beginning.  The feeling hasn’t changed, just the sense of newness has left me.  This new Skoolie project will bring back the sense of newness without giving up the perks of living tiny, in fact, this bus is more road worthy than any of our other homes (lol!) and I look forward to traveling the country in it.

Keep on working toward your goal.  You can do it!  I know you can!

I’m Carmen Shenk, the Tiny House Foodie, reminding you that we can #LiveTiny #EmbraceSimplicity and still #EatWell.  Thanks for watching, I really appreciate it!29c45-1a2bcarmen

Food Processor – Day 18

14 graterToday we get out all the tools that grate and slice.  Clean out the storage space and consider which items to return to the cabinet.  Think especially in terms of removing redundant tools and keeping in mind the weight, space, and power restrictions of living tiny.  If you are moving into a micro unit, you may only want to keep the knife and cutting board.  If you’re headed for a small space you may appreciate having a grater/slicer with a lid.  If you have a larger kitchen with no power restrictions then you may enjoy having a small food processor.  The “right answer” for you depends on the purpose you have in this season of your life.

Tiny House communities are really great places to have a lending library of tools that most members won’t need often, but might like to have access to now and then.  This is an excellent opportunity to create such a library or donate tools for use in such a library.  Consider your favorite charities that create food for the homeless, or maybe talk to someone at the local daycare to see if they need equipment you no longer need.  Continue to think of creative places to donate these larger kitchen appliances where they serve the needs of the community.  And donating an appliance that is in good condition to the charity of your choice is a great way to support a cause that matters to you.

How does your donate pile look by now?  Have you been removing items from your kitchen that you no longer need or wish to store or care for?  Congratulations!  Share a photograph with me using the hashtag #KitchenSimplicity or tweet to @TinyHouseFoodie on Twitter or Instagram, and follow me on Facebook.  I look forward to hearing from you.  Leaving a comment is always welcome.

I’m Carmen Shenk, the Tiny House Foodie, reminding you that we can #LiveTiny #EmbraceSimplicity and still #EatWell.  Thanks for watching, I really appreciate it!29c45-1a2bcarmen

Introducing the Capsule Kitchen

Creating a “Capsule” of Essentials

Photo Oct 25, 6 31 06 PMIn the 1970’s, boutique owner Susie Faux created a collection of a few essential items of clothing that don’t go out of fashion. The idea was that with a few good basics, you could create a wardrobe of clothing that was infinitely useful, always interchangeable, and came with the confidence that no matter which items you paired – you’d be well dressed. The question of “What will I wear?” was drastically simplified by owning less, while each item was of a better quality. Thus the “capsule wardrobe” was born and various clothing designers, boutique owners, consumers, and bloggers have continued the tradition.

I love my capsule wardrobe and find that I am better dressed than ever. I’m wearing better quality clothing, and I leave the house with more confidence. Plus, once I have my capsule in place, I find it much easier to donate good quality items that didn’t make the cut.

Recently I asked myself… “Why can’t I apply this capsule concept to the kitchen?” And that’s how this Capsule Kitchen idea began.  And really… what could be more perfect for a tiny house kitchen, than a key group of essentials from which you can cook anything?! 

Therefore, I’m bringing you my capsule kitchen with this Tiny House Foodie website. This is a little group of classic foodie essentials that bring cooking back to the age-old basics without sacrificing flavor or contentment.

I’ve recently given my website a big makeover, and set up the material more like a class.  You can see the various modules of the class on the front page of the website.  Take them at your own pace, and as you dive into each section, follow this simple process:

Photo Oct 25, 3 12 54 PMFirst, go through your own kitchen with me, section by section.

And the first thing to do is to take inventory.  Bring everything out of the cabinets (one section at a time) and put it all on the table or on the counter tops, and have a look around at it all.  Does it surprise you that there is so much?

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Second, as you look at the collection, look for items that are not good for you.

Toxic Teflon coatings on cookware, or glasses with chips that have made the edges sharp, or plastic that could be leaching chemicals into your food.  Immediately remove those items from your collection to the trash, and recycle where possible.  Also remove malignant items – things that have a negative memory or sense of shame attached.  We have all outgrown having toxic things around, people and malignant things.  As an act of self care, remove these items.

Photo Oct 25, 3 19 29 PMThird, assess what’s in your collection.

If items are broken, or if a pan has a loose handle that looks like it might let loose at some inopportune moment, remove those items to the trash.  If the mixer has been hanging on by a tattered cord, remove it.  Things that are simply worn out may be removed to the trash.  I know the environment is in crisis, but your home is not the landfill.  You have permission not to live with trash in your home, so quickly remove worn out things from your space.  Recycle where possible.  Donate if there seems to be some life left in an item.

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Now, create the capsule kitchen you want based on the way you cook.

(Not the way you want to cook, or the cook you wish you were… but the way you actually cook today.)

  • Consider what equipment in your kitchen gets used once a month or more often, and remove the rest to be donated.  Donating rarely used items frees you to be who you are, not who you were.
  • Upgrade key items to lifetime pieces using the buyer’s guide on these pages.
  • Never purchase something to match your kitchen – always purchase items in the colors you love the most.  They will inevitably match or blend nicely together.

A friend of mine suggested to her daughter to purchase a white Kitchen Aid because it would always go with everything.  But her daughter was inclined toward a beautiful green one.  My friend told me later that she regretted giving this advice to her daughter because she knew that she would find pleasure in having the green one – and it would always match her kitchen because she’s always loved green.  Choose colors that match you – and those items will always look great in your kitchen.


Before you begin taking things out of your kitchen cabinets, watch this:

I’ve set this up this website like a class, and the first thing I’d mention may not be the first think you think when you enter your kitchen and take a look around with downsizing on your mind.  However, it’s foundational to the process.  So today we begin by asking “What’s your Why?”  Think about it, find me on social media and leave me a comment.  I look forward to hearing from you.


Next, pick your favorites.

Your assignment for the day is to look around your kitchen and choose your favorite items. Get everyone in the family in on this. Choose items that have good memories and stories attached. Choose items that are beautiful and useful. Narrow it down to just three items per person in the household. It may seem like an easy assignment, but it may be harder than you think. This is where the simplicity of the Capsule Kitchen begins.

Photo Oct 25, 6 25 15 PMMy very favorite thing in my kitchen is a vivid fuchsia Kitchen Aid.  When we had the restaurant we had to create a schedule for using the one Kitchen Aid so it was time to purchase another to improve efficiency.  I happened to be walking by when my husband was shopping for the new one and saw the vivid fuchsia one and exclaimed over how beautiful it was.  Then I caught myself, because that wasn’t the wise purchase at that time.  Later when the box came and the gorgeous Kitchen Aid was inside and my Austrian just shrugged and said “It matches you…” and that simple machine became an example of the way he loves me extravagantly.  What a blessing he is to me!  Guess what’s on my counter in my kitchen – even though I don’t bake as much these days because of food allergies?!


Finally, Choose Your Cause

 

Today we talk about selling, donating, and giving away the things in your home that no longer serve your purpose. What is the charity in your area that supports a cause that matters to you? What kinds of donations do they accept? What other options do you have that are unique to your area and your values? How can you use your extra stuff to support these missions in your community? Prepare a few boxes for the things you no longer need and make a plan now to deliver those items to the charity of your choice. I’d love to hear how it’s going with you, please connect with me on social media and let me know how it’s going.

There is an exciting transformation ahead of you!

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Next:

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