Random Things I love about the Tiny House Community

We really enjoyed the Mid Atlantic Tiny House Expo this weekend in West Friendship Maryland!  We’re back and making a fast pivot to Pipe Organ Conservation, but wanted to take a few moments and share some thoughts about events like these. Please excuse my bedhead and the fact that I’m moving pretty slow this morning.  OH, and I forgot to use my microphone, so please turn up your speaker and hopefully you’ll be able to hear my thoughts.  I just wanted to give you an authentic moment in the life of a tiny house speaker and author, and I’m sorry, but I didn’t even comb my hair to do this.  I share a few of the things I love most about an event like this one and the community that makes these things possible.

Fuchsia Ad 1My very favorite thing is watching people come through and experience tiny houses – sometimes for the first time.  Most people can’t afford the $100K buildings that are sometimes at these shows, and that’s fine.  What I love is when a college student explores the inside of a Sprinter van, or a box truck, or a DIY tiny and they look around.  I got to see the light go on for a few people in those moments – you can almost see them realize that this is something they CAN do.  And if you can live in a van/bus/tinyhouse/whatever it is… and live simply?  There are so many opportunities and so much freedom suddenly available to you.  And I love seeing that happen!  I love seeing the moment when people start to realize that this life IS within reach!  You CAN do it.

A tiny house isn’t going to change your life – the simplicity that you HAVE TO LEARN to make the tiny house thing work?  That’s the game changer part of all this!  I love tiny houses, I went tiny in 2014, and I’ve been to a lot of tiny house festivals and toured many beautiful homes.  It’s not the house that will change your life – it’s Simplicity that is required to live comfortably there.  And I suppose that’s why I’m still here talking about Kitchen Simplicity (Both my book – and the broader idea) of really embracing Simplicity – no matter where or how you live – or whether your home has wheels or not.  In the end the mindset is everything – and that also happens to be my favorite part about my first book – Kitchen Simplicity!  (Which… by the way… I noticed the Kindle book was available on Amazon for only $2.99 – and it’s usually $4.99 so if Kindle is your preferred way to get a book then this is good timing for you!)

Unfortunately, sometimes my ipad malfunctions and I can’t upload my photos anymore – but I can still upload them to Instagram so pop over there and see photos and video from the Mid-Atlantic Tiny House Expo.  It was great fun!

And remember, you can go tiny, embrace simplicity, and still eat really well!

All my best,

Carmen Shenk Logo Mini

4 Great Resources to Help You Simplify your Kitchen

Fuchsia Ad 1Back in July when my new book came out, I looked around and thought to myself… “I’m not done.”  Sure, I have other books in the Tiny House Foodie series that I haven’t written yet, so that’s still on my list.  But more than that… I want to create great resources for people who are going tiny, and I’m not finished talking about my favorite part of the home – the kitchen.  Some folks will prefer to learn from a book, others will prefer a video series… and still others will prefer a podcast that they can listen to on their commute.  So I decided to keep going and make more great resources to help you simplify your kitchen.  These are helpful for anyone who is making the transition to a simple life in a smaller space – or anyone who wants to live more comfortably in the space you already enjoy.

In the last few months I’ve created three great workshops in addition to my book and you can find them by hovering over the “Shop” tab, and then choosing “Courses” from the tab above.  I created these classes over at Teachable.com and I really like the set up over there.  While putting together all the information for a class isn’t an easy task, I think it’s really worth it because it makes it so simple for you.  All that info is in one place in a multi-media workshop where part of it is in video, part of it is text, and if I want to throw in a chart, or recipe, or a PDF sheet with reference information for you to download – I can do that.  It really is a one-stop-shop!  I think these workshops are a great resource and I’m really happy to make them available to you!

So here are my three new workshops: thumbnail workshop

A 15 minute demonstration with a helpful PDF download


thumbnail remove skunky funk

Five session workshop, a recipe with five variations, a helpful PDF reference sheet, and more…


Thumbnail Video Series

A comprehensive 24 session video series with additional reading if you want to dive deeper, plus a Facebook group for discussion.

For a limited time

you can get the

Kitchen Gear List Workshop

AND the Remove the Skunky Funk

FREE

when you purchase

Right-Size Your Kitchen

(a $67 value) for only $47! 

Don’t delay! 

This offer won’t last long!


Here’s more info on my brand new:

Introducing a brand new resource to help you manage smells in your tiny house.  By that I mean get rid of them – not cover them up with a chemical smell – because we both know that doesn’t work!  This information will change everything for folks who have been haunted by disgusting smells in their tiny homes!  I’m absolutely convinced that this class will help you breathe easy in your tiny home!


Fuchsia Ad 2And don’t forget Kitchen Simplicity where I packed lots of great information!  It’s partly practical and partly the philosophical things I learned when we closed our 3,000 sq ft restaurant and went tiny in 125 sq ft. in the fall of 2014.  The idea of purposeful simplicity is at the heart of this little book, and it makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE in how it feels to live tiny!  I know this one little idea is worth the price of the book, but that’s not all I packed in there.  lol! I pass along the keys to making tiny house living a joy!

The kindle book is regularly $4.99 but Amazon has it for $2.99 right now and I don’t know how long that will last so pop over there and snag a copy before that price goes away!  And if you’re like me and like the feel of having a book in your hands… here’s the paperback.

Thanks so much for dropping by my website today, I really appreciate it!  And remember, we can go tiny, embrace simplicity, and still eat really well!

Simply,

Carmen Shenk Logo Mini

24 Steps to a Kitchen that is Exactly Right for You!

Is the chaos in your kitchen on your last nerve?  Don’t even know what all you have in there anymore?  Have you been thinking about simplifying your life?  Isn’t it high time? Since my new book, Kitchen Simplicity (Tiny House Foodie) came out, I have continued to work to expand the resources I have to offer folks who are seeking to downsize or right-size their homes – especially the most challenging room: the kitchen!

Take it from me, a retired chef and restaurant owner who has lived in 125 sq ft for quite a few years now – it’s entirely possible to live tiny very comfortably – without sacrificing flavor or contentment.

A tiny kitchen still cooks – IF you right-size your collection of kitchen gear the right way.  I can help you through this process with a focused strategic process that you can take at your own pace.  It’s important not to waste your resources or get rid of something you’ll just have to replace later.  With that in mind, I’m so happy to announce my brand new 24 session Right-Size Your Kitchen Video Series: putting the Mmm back in Minimalism! Learn more >

Video Series

In 24 detailed sessions I’ll show you the practical steps to right-size every part of your kitchen collection.  You’ll soon be feeling the liberation of living tiny!  Learn more…

Horse Chow

Part of our “going tiny” journey included reading “The Good Life” by Helen (1904-1995) and Scott Nearing (1883-1983) who were the great-grandparents of the simple living movement. They wrote extensively on debt free living and self-reliance. In those days they were considered radicals, and I suppose by modern, consumerist standards – that’s still a fitting word to describe them.

Helen Nearing wrote “Simple Food For the Good Life” in 1980 and it’s a very unusual cookbook. The recipes are in narrative form. For example: “We buy a 50-pound bag of popcorn kernels wholesale, and can use up to two bags a year, as we serve popcorn on any occasion from breakfast to lunch to evening gatherings.” She mentions that she prefers it to cornflakes. Interesting. We also eat a lot of popcorn, but I’ve never popped corn for breakfast, I might have to try that.

I made hot oatmeal for breakfast a few times last winter, on mornings when it was crazy cold. You’ve never seen a grown man get more dramatic than when a steaming bowl of hot “porridge” appeared before my husband for breakfast. Apparently, this is the horror inflicted on the youth of Britain that makes them dream of expanding the Commonwealth – presumably to get better food. Or so I’m told. And by the way, if eating wallpaper paste is frowned upon – why does cooked oatmeal even exist?!

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Tiny House Food Storage

In an effort to stem the flow of gelatinous oats, my Austrian husband began extolling the virtues of Muesli. Nevermind. Another cold snap hit and I cooked up another satisfying hot oatmeal breakfast with plenty of butter and raisins. Yum! He’s not one to disappoint, so he told the stories of his youth in the Tyrolian Alps of Austria… where he was subjected to wearing itchy, hand-knit woolen garments… but he was never tortured like this… and here’s where he held up a spoon of cool oatmeal and allowed it to fall back to the bowl with a rather satisfying “splat!”. He offered a clump of it to the dog, and she sniffed at it… but turned away. Et tu, Bitch?

IMG_8560Imagine my surprise when the next time we visited our favorite bulk food store, he stocked up on rolled oatmeal, raisins, and walnuts. Oh boy, what is he up to?! No worries, I was busy picking out avocados and almonds for breakfast. Yum. I also made sure we had enough oil, butter, and honey and wondered how long it had been since I’d made granola. Do I still have the recipe? Have I downsized all the cookie sheets? “What’s Granola?” he asked. How do you explain Granola?

IMG_8565While Xaver and I were in our oatmeal negotiations… I came across Helen Nearing’s recipe for “Horse Chow”. I read aloud to him from her book: “In the early 1930’s, before health foods and granola became household words, I made up a dish we called ‘Horse Chow’. At that time raw oats were not being eaten by humans.” This is where a rather amusing noise emanated from my Austrian. I looked at him. “What?!” he blurted, trying to look innocent.

Shall I continue?” I asked.

This is the simplest granola of all and perhaps one of the earliest. It was dreamed up in the Austrian Tyrol, where we holed up one winter in a village far from supplies with a very slim larder of hit-or-miss articles, but with great appetites.” “Ha!” he said – in triumph! The debate over oatmeal ended there while we giggled about being holed up for an Austrian winter and somehow “arousing” great appetites. LOL!

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Helen Nearing’s recipe for Horse Chow:

4 cups rolled oats (old-fashioned, not the quick cook kind)

½ cup raisins

Juice of 1 lemon

Dash of sea salt

Olive oil or vegetable oil to moisten

Mix all together. We eat it in wooden bowls with wooden spoons.”

IMG_8568That’s how “Horse Chow” became the breakfast of choice around here. Even on mornings when it’s cold outside!

My Austrian’s version:

2 lbs raw rolled oats

¼ lb walnuts

½ lb raisins

1/3 lb sliced almonds

and toasted coconut

Served with homemade yogurt or milk to moisten.

My version:

Two scoops of his mix

2 T raw pumpkin seeds

2 T raw almonds

1 T ground flax seeds

Served with almond milk to moisten and topped with fresh fruit.

 

Horse Chow, our version

We eat it in china bowls with silver spoons.

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Yum.

* * * * *

For help going tiny without sacrificing flavor or contentment, get my helpful

Super Simple Kitchen Gear List – it’s free!  Learn more…

Signature Tiny House Foodie logo

Reminding you that we can go tiny, embrace simplicity, and still eat really well!

A New Tool to Help YOU Right-Size Your Kitchen

I’ve created a video course to compliment my new book, Kitchen Simplicity.  This video class shows rather than tells how to right-size your kitchen in a very practical step-by-step approach.  I will take you through the 24 sessions at the pace you choose and finish up by showing you the super simple collection of kitchen gear that I’ll be moving into my new 128 square foot Skoolie when it’s finished.  Xaver and I initially went tiny in the fall of 2014 and we already know that this thoughtfully selected collection of kitchen gear is all we need in our tiny house.  I’ll show you what, how, but most importantly – WHY.  Let me help you right-size your kitchen without sacrificing flavor or contentment!

Right-Size Your Kitchen Video Series

That Time I Hated My Tiny House

There have been some times over our years of living tiny that Xaver and I have faced some really crazy schnitzel together.  Dominant culture tells us that having a lot of stuff equals wealth.  And yet, there I was looking around at my tiny house and realizing that I had a fraction of the stuff I used to have.  So… does that mean I’m poor?  People that knew our living situation sometimes treated us as if we were poor, but were they right to do so?

Culture tells us that a guy with a nice house, a nice yard, and a couple of nice cars is a pretty good guy.  A woman with an expansive collection of shoes and handbags, and a business empire is really something special.  And Billionaires are gods.  They must be smarter, wiser, or maybe they know some secrets the rest of us don’t know or they wouldn’t be wealthy, right?  And yet we’re seeing day-by-day proof in our political arena that wealth does not equal wisdom and human value can’t be measured by the mathematical equation of net worth.  I knew that a wealthy person wasn’t worth more than me in my head, but somehow my heart wasn’t getting the message.

There we were in our tiny house, living out some sort of intentional homelessness.  Sometimes it felt like we were doing something revolutionary.  Screw the system!  Sometimes it felt like we were being naughty because when people don’t understand your steps outside of conformity, they sometimes pull out the disapproval.  But I don’t have to live by their standard.  I have to live by mine.  When we stayed grateful (which wasn’t always) then it was an amazing and liberating experience.  And when I focused on what I didn’t have, it was awful.

Xaver and I have been through some battles that brought us back together at the end of the day feeling like the world had chewed us up and spit us out.  In fact, we had a client with a three million dollar project decide that they didn’t want to pay their bill for the work we’d done for them.  We actually had to take them to court.  It was one of those David and Goliath moments, and believe me, it wasn’t fun.  What made it worse was that “Goliath” was a congregation with the meanest pastor I’ve ever met.  I’m also a person of faith.  Church folk aren’t supposed to act like that!  What made it worse yet was that we had earmarked that money to pay a bill… and since that money didn’t come – our other bill got bigger and bigger.  The legal battle took forever!  We were demoralized, hurt, and angry.  There were times when I looked around at my tiny house, and I looked at our clients with their expansive 3 million dollar church renovation project… I felt very small and very poor.  There were moments in that season where I hated my tiny house.  It was a reminder of what we didn’t have.  And dealing with lawyers and the legal system only accentuated the sense that “justice” was beyond our grasp.

I was stressed out.  We both were.  In that season we created some new habits for ourselves that really helped.  These little habits helped us move from the poverty mindset into purposeful simplicity to make our home a haven.

Turning off the Screens

And we’d turn on the news and it would be some crazy “sky-is-falling” stuff and on top of what we were going through.  It felt like too much!  Twitter or Facebook would be flipping out over this or that new scandalous event.  We turned off the screens. We’d make a great meal, and open a bottle of wine left over from the restaurant.  We’d light a beeswax candle and put on some nice music.  Then we’d pull out the cards and play games for a while.  Without really meaning to, we were changing our focus away from the big bad world beyond the walls of our tiny home and placing our focus on the wealth of love that we shared.  It was amazing how much it helped to enjoy a lovely meal and unwind together.

Rituals

We also have some little rituals that have helped us.  When we’re really feeling low, we go outside and brush the negativity off of each other as if it were dandruff or dog hair.  Sometimes we go inside after a long day and wash our hands to wash away the cares of the day.  We pause to say a prayer before our meal and thank God for getting us through another day.  These were small rituals, but they have helped us make our home a haven.

Connection

In cases where we’re really struggling, but for whatever reason the problems we are facing need to remain closely held, that isolation can become a real challenge.  In fact, tiny houses are a great help it keeping isolation at bay!  I didn’t realize how great tiny houses were at keeping us connected until much later.

In January one year, the host of our favorite AirBNB invited us to stay at his place for a week.  He and his home hold a very special place in our home so of course we were delighted to visit.  I spent some time in the kitchen baking apple pies.  There was a glorious huge TV in the kitchen, so while I baked my pies, I listened to a documentary on minimalism. Do I know how to party or what?! LOL!

Xaver was in the next room, reading a book. Later I mentioned to him something I’d noticed in the documentary, and he didn’t even know I had the television on! In a tiny house, if the TV is on, everyone hears it! In fact, as that week progressed in that huge house, I began to feel more and more isolated. I was surprised how the vast empty spaces of a beautiful home could make me feel so alone. I was so happy to get back home to our tiny cozy space. That reality of being connected and close is one of the things I love about our tiny home. We’re together. We’re connected. We can hear each other without raising our voices. That isolation just can’t hang out with us. We’re close. Literally. The fact that the space is small and cozy really does focus our connection in a way a big house just cant do. This is to our advantage. We stay connected and bring friends and family into that space through hospitality, and isolation doesn’t stand a chance.

The Dove Family

doves

Years ago I heard a guy talking about a family of doves that lived in his porch.  When the family fought, the doves would leave.  When the family lived in peace, the doves would return.  I suppose that’s true no matter what size your home is.

Through a very difficult season of our lives when our tiny house accentuated our sense of poverty, we learned a few things that helped us remember that our choice to go tiny was about purposeful simplicity.  We learned to turn off the screens and enjoy a lovely meal together.  We learned small rituals that had meaning to us.  And we learned to stay close to each other.  In this way our tiny house became our haven-home.  It really is possible to use the tender walls of a tiny home to create space that is sacred, restful, and healing.  

Peace be with you,

Signature Tiny House Foodie logo

Kitchen Simplicity

IMG_3744My cute little book is ready for the world today, and I’m so pleased to make it available far and wide. This has been a long time coming! Find your copy on Amazon. I can’t wait to hear what you think of it!

4 ways to share this book - BIG

The Shareables are here!

And thanks so much to each of you! This sweet little book has been a labor of love for me, and to hear you all responding with such interesting and thoughtful reviews and comments on social media has just been incredibly gratifying! Over and over again I have been moved by the way people respond to this little book and I appreciate all of you so very much!!! <3

All my best,

Signature Tiny House Foodie logo

Getting Vinnie Legal with the DMV

IMG_426034 days ago, our documents arrived at the DMV in Richmond (the capital of Virginia) including the form we were given by the folks at our local DMV.

We just got it back in the mail with a “application denied” letter and thankfully they included *the right form* for us to fill out and send back. They also included a very clear list of requirements, which is hugely helpful because try as I might, I could not find Virginia’s list of requirements anywhere online and our local DMV didn’t have that information at hand.IMG_4263

I know what we need to do now. One requirement is to create a detailed document with all the changes we’ve made to the bus, have it notarized, then send the whole stack of info back to Richmond again. Then there is an inspection. We were initially told it would take two weeks, but we now know that it will be a another 30 some days minimum. Expectations adjusted.

Sadly we won’t be able to take our Skoolie to Omaha Nebraska for Tiny Fest Midwest as we had planned. That’s a bummer! I was so looking forward to meeting more tiny house and Skoolie people, especially since I follow so many of you on Instagram and love seeing your beautiful homes!! Plan B is in the works – no worries!

IMG_4331The silver lining is that now we can help anyone else trying to change a bus to an RV here in Virginia. People who are considering the Skoolie thing need to know that it can be kind of complicated (but still totally worth it). People also need to know that Virginia is one of the toughest states for the bus to RV transition, so if you can buy a bus and make the transition in another state, that might not be a bad idea. Apparently North Carolina is pretty easy – no inspection. At any rate, when I get time I will write up the whole thing on our website so that people can have the info they need to get it done much more quickly.

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In what state did you do your build, and what were the requirements? If you have all this info written up on your own blog for your state, please send me the link and I’ll link to all of them.

Sometimes getting to simplicity is kind of complicated, but it will be worth it.

We get by with a little help from our friends.”

Signature Tiny House Foodie logo

Mise en Place

“A place for everything, everything in its place.”  —Benjamin Franklin

There is a cooking practice, called Mise en Place [mizã ‘plas] which means putting each ingredient in place before you begin cooking. This is a classical approach to cooking used by professionals to have every ingredient ready to go at the beginning of service. 28c13-img_7861For example, instead of having a bell pepper on the counter, a chef would prepare a container of bell pepper cut precisely the way she or he prefers. Chef would prepare this before any cooking began. Television cooking shows sometimes do this: every ingredient—even each spice—will be placed out on the counter in darling little bowls. This sort of preparedness and efficiency allows one to enjoy the un-rushed art of focused cooking that can lead to spectacular meals.

Red Black 2To follow “Mise en Place” literally creates a lot of dishes to wash and I have mixed feelings about this.  I do keep some sweet little bowls in my kitchen, because I love them and I have collected them over the years when I see a cute one at a thrift shop.  I don’t cook by recipe though, so I’m not measuring out a teaspoon of this or that and putting it in a lovely tiny bowl – only to empty it into the saute pan in a few moments.  In fact, I enjoy a variation of “Mise en Place” cooking simply by having the lemons, limes, garlic, ginger, and other spices and herbs conveniently located to my cooktop.  In fact, because my kitchen is tiny, everything is already conveniently located – and isn’t that the point of Mise en Place?

Red Black 1The beauty of a tiny kitchen is that you may set it up for efficiency. Everything can be right in its place, and right within reach, not because you got it out of the cabinet to put it there – but because that’s where it lives. The tiny house kitchen has a sort of built in efficiency that guarantees that every ingredient and tool is close at hand. You can still decide to prep ingredients before you begin cooking – such as cutting the vegetables and peeling the shrimp. Efficiency is one of the things I love about cooking in a tiny house kitchen.

49678-img_7877In fact, Xaver and I visited our favorite AirBNB for a working vacation. There is an expansive glorious tricked-out kitchen that is pure perfection in every respect and I love it! I was looking forward to really spreading out and enjoying some cooking and baking in a “real” kitchen after having lived tiny for so long. What surprised me was how frustrating it was to want something that was on the other side of the kitchen and how much time I spent running around gathering up ingredients and equipment – not to mention cleaning it all and putting it back away. I was surprised how much longer it took me to prepare a very simple meal. I was also surprised by how annoying it was to want the plate that was held captive in a dish washer that wouldn’t be done washing for a while. In fact, I was very surprised to find that cooking in a large kitchen equipped with every possible convenience was much more tiring and much less fun than I remembered. Wasn’t this kitchen the holy grail? Surprisingly, no. Not to me. Not anymore.

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Mind you, our entire tiny house could fit inside that kitchen with room to spare – so the scale and proportions are hilarious by contrast.  For many people, a large kitchen is their “normal”. In fact, when we had the restaurant we had an expansive 580 sq ft prep kitchen and a smaller 240 sq ft kitchen where dishes were assembled and plated. I was used to cooking in a tricked-out kitchen… but look how my sense of normal changed after living tiny for a number of years?! Now, I’m perfectly happy to cook a great meal in a very small kitchen where everything is right at hand. In fact, having now tried the various cooking and baking options, I’d have to say that a tiny kitchen is my preference.  I’m as surprised by this as you are.

Shrimp Rohini

Shrimp Rohini, recipe by Carmen Shenk

We tend to think of having a small kitchen as a problem to be dealt with.  We wonder if we will have room to cook our favorite dishes or bake our favorite treats.  We fear running out of space and being frustrated by a confining kitchen. But living tiny has taught me that cooking in a tiny kitchen is a wonderful thing.  Everything is right there.  There are no wasted steps.  There is no needless complexity.  It’s just focused, fun, efficient cooking.  We tend to worry about the space we may lose in a tiny kitchen, but what if we focused instead on the efficiency we gain?

What if the tiny house kitchen was the “holy grail” of cooking and we just didn’t know it?!

That’s something to chew on, isn’t it?!

Signature Tiny House Foodie logoBTW, doesn’t that Shrimp dish look amazing?  The recipe I created for Shrimp Rohini is here… (along with the story of what inspired it) and that’s one dish where cooking in the traditional Mise en Place style is a very good idea!  Enjoy!

The Tiny House NC Street Festival

Street FestXaver and I had a great time at the Tiny House NC Street Festival in Pink Hill, North Carolina last weekend!  The hospitality of the host, Andrew Odom, and the community was spectacular.  They really did show southern hospitality and it was a joy to be there!

I spoke on Saturday and again on Sunday at “center stage” which was this lovely shaded spot with some bleachers and a sound system.  I spoke on Pain, Pie, Poverty, and Purpose.  We met the most interesting people – plus – touring those tiny homes and skoolies is always energizing to me!

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The best Shrimp & Grits I’ve ever had – from Chef & the Farmer

I tried to get a reservation at the Chef and the Farmer, but they were full.  That was fine, but then Andrew Odom pulled some strings and got us in, and boy are we grateful to him!!  Xaver and I even enjoyed a delectable meal of steak tartare, beet salad, catch of the day, shrimp & grits, and dessert!  That was the best meal I’ve ever had and it challenged me to up my game!  lol!

I’ve been getting really great feedback on the book and that is so gratifying.  After the many solitary months I have invested in getting those words on the page, it really rocks to share this message with the world and see it resonate with other people.  I wrote it to help people navigate the transition to living tiny – and it would appear that it is doing exactly that.  I’m soaking it all up and glowing because of this happy outcome!Screenshot (6)

Tiny houses and festivals are exciting and fun, but the downsizing process may not be.  I created a Super-Simple Kitchen Gear List to help you move gently through the process.  Sign up here to get the FREE PDF.  This is not dogma – just a resource to help you create the simple collection that is right for you.

PLUS, as an added bonusvideo series – here is my Right-Sizing Your Kitchen Video Series.  You will find this practical and helpful as you work through your kitchen at your own pace.  If you find that you need to replace or upgrade a few items, then check out my handy Buying Guide for help in selecting just the right items for you.  I have found that the quality-over-quantity approach really suits me.

I’m passionate about tiny house minimalism because it helped us hit the reset button on our lives and I know there are a lot of folks who would also benefit from a reset.  Plus, TINY house minimalism makes room for BIG dreams!  So I’ll happily travel to meet the people who are interested in tiny house living and I’ll have one message: I’m here to help you navigate through the transition of going tiny – especially in the kitchen.  You can do this, I know you can!

Deek Screenshot

Derek Diedricksen with my book.  His new book is coming out in November, so make sure to pre-order your copy now.

If you’re in the neighborhood, I’ll see you in Fredricksburg, Virginia on May 12th and 13th.  The festival details are here.  Look me up!  I’ll have the FESTIVAL COPY of my book available – and this is the edition that won’t be available anywhere else but a tiny house festival!  Soon enough (June?) it’ll be on Amazon and a lot of other interesting places.  At the moment – visiting a tiny house festival is the only way to get one.  That means I get to meet folks like you and we will talk together about our challenges and triumphs.  It’ll be great fun!

All my best,

TinyHouseFoodie.com
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